Also called garbanzo beans, chickpeas are a small, round, and buttery-tasting legume originating from the Middle East.

Health Benefits

  • Great for the digestive system: chickpeas are high in insoluble fiber, which is then used as “food” for good bacteria in the colon. This promotes colon health and decreased risk of colon cancer.
  • Maintains cardiovascular health: chickpeas also have soluble fiber, which is associated with heart health. Antioxidants found in chickpeas help maintain blood vessel integrity.
  • Blood glucose maintenance: high amounts of fiber and protein found in chickpeas help to stabilize the pace of digestion, improving regulation of blood sugar which can decrease the risk of diabetes.
  • High fiber content in chickpeas helps with satiety and can help with weight management.
  • Chickpeas contain blood pressure lowering potassium.
  • Reduce inflammation: choline found in chickpeas is important in muscle movement, sleep, and brain function. It reduces inflammation, aids in nerve signal transmission, and maintains cell wall health.

SELECTION & STORAGE

  • You can buy chickpeas, dried, in bulk or in a bag. Be sure there are no signs of wetness or rot. Be sure to soak at least 4 hours or overnight before using. This will plump up the chickpeas and ensure quicker cooking time!
  • Store dried chickpeas in an airtight container in a cool and dry environment for up to 12 months.
  • Be sure if you’re buying canned chickpeas there is no salt added! Take note, buying canned chickpeas will decrease nutrient value. When in a pinch, canned is fine- buy try to buy dried.
  • Cooked chickpeas will last in an airtight container in the refrigerator for about three days.

How to Use

  • Make hummus from chickpeas, cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil, lemon juice, and spices
  • Bake in the oven with salt, pepper, and cayenne for a savory snack
  • Add to soups, salads, and pasta dishes
  • Make chickpea fritters with other veggies, herbs, and spices
  • As a side dish with sauteed vegetables, like tomatoes, kale, and onion

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